Lola Rose by Jacqueline Wilson

Ever since we read The Dinosaur’s Packed Lunch when she was very young, my daughter and I have loved Jacqueline Wilson books. From Hetty Feather to The Butterfly Club and Clover Moon to Katy, Jacqueline Wilson has written some really brilliant stories. Sadly I fear my daughter might be starting to get a bit old for them, but she never seems to tire of them and there are still a few books she hasn’t read. She’d heard that Lola Rose was a particularly good one, which even friends who don’t much like Jacqueline Wilson have enjoyed.

Nobody writes a story about tough times and difficult issues like Jacqueline Wilson. And poor old Lola Rose has two difficult issues to deal with – domestic violence and cancer.

Lola Rose didn’t always have such a glamorous name. She used to be plain old Jayni, a quiet girl with little confidence, whose dad beats her mum. When her dad hits Jayni for the first time, Jayni, her mum and her little brother, Kenny run away. To keep themselves safe, they take on new identities and Jayni chooses the name Lola Rose for herself.

But she soon realises that changing her name may be easy, but starting a new life isn’t quite as easy. Lola Rose’s mum is pretty chaotic and she often finds herself looking after her little brother, who misses his dad, and worrying about money. Lola Rose lives in constant fear that her dad will track them down and drag them back home.

When her mum finds a lump in her breast, Lola Rose is left trying to care for Kenny and her mum and wondering how on earth they will even afford to eat. In desperation, she calls her mum’s estranged sister, Auntie Barbara. Auntie Barbara bustles into their lives and does all she can to care for them.

Will Lola Rose and her family get their happy ending?

This is a very moving book for slightly older readers than the average Jacqueline Wilson. Jacqueline Wilson herself says it is one of the books which is closest to her heart and Auntie Barbara is one of her favourite characters she’s ever created. Written with the help of a mum with cancer and her two daughters, it really is a beautiful and emotional read for older tweens and young teenagers.

Lola Rose, Lola Rose by Jacqueline Wilson, Jacqueline Wilson, Book review

Author: Sarah Mummy

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14 Comments

  1. Do you know I hadn’t really realised until I saw your post that my eldest daughter has drifted away from Jaqueline Wilson books in the past year 🙁 This sounds quite moving! #readwithme

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    • To be honest, I feel like I’m getting ready for my daughter to drift away from them too! We’ve been reading them for so many years and there are things which are a little bit repetitive in them. But she still loves them, so we will keep going with them until she is ready to move on. I’m sure she will want to get My Mum Tracey Beaker, which has just come out.

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  2. My older daughter loves Jaqueline Wilson books. I don’t think she has this one so I’ll keep an eye out for it in the charity shop.

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    • I’m sure she will love it! My daughter has read most of them, but we still come across the occasional one she hasn’t read.

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  3. Oh how I loved these growing up – The Lottie Project was my favourite! #readwithme

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    • Now you’re making me feel old! Jacqueline Wilson was definitely after my time! My daughter read The Lottie Project at school, so I don’t know it myself, but I know it’s one of her favourites.

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  4. Sounds a good book although not for us. Son1 understandably wouldn’t even want to see this on son2’s bookshelves. He has tried to distance himself from all thoughts about cancer since his treatment ended #readwithme

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    • That’s definitely understandable! Certainly one for you all to avoid.

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  5. It’s great how Jacqueline Wilson tackles difficult issues in her books. I think this sounds like a book my oldest niece would enjoy.

    #ReadWithMe

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    • That’s what I love about Jacqueline Wilson. She helps kids in difficult situations feel less alone and she helps kids with more straightforward lives understand that not everyone is as lucky as they are.

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  6. We’ve yet to move onto Jacqueline Wilson books yet, although my daughter could read them she’s a sensitive soul do would struggle with the content. This sounds like a really good book though, dealing with very big issues.

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    • I don’t think they’re good for sensitive souls! Maybe your daughter will manage them when she’s a bit older.

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  7. Can’t wait for my daughter to get into Jacqueline Wilson! I loved her books, I hadn’t heard of this one but it sounds quite emotional! #readwithme

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    • I’ve loved reading Jacqueline Wilson with my daughter over the years. I’m definitely too old to have read them myself as a child!

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